Pastor Fritz Foltz

Pastor Foltz is Pastor Emeritus of Saint James Lutheran Church in Gettysburg, PA and author of the the Frontline Study content.

A Child is Born to US (A Sermon)

A Child is Born to US (A Sermon)

Isaiah 9: 6-7 For a child has been born for us, a son given to us; authority rests upon his shoulders; and he is named Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. His authority shall grow continually, and there shall be endless peace for the throne of David and his kingdom. He will […]

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Wise Men Search for the Baby (A Sermon)

Wise Men Search for the Baby (A Sermon)

This season has always been a time of searching. My favorite example is an Ethiopia custom that is acted out every Epiphany. These very tall black men dress as Wise Men to go through the villages in a search for the baby Jesus. In the middle of the night, they stop at every hut, knock […]

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The Hallelujah Chorus (A Sermon)

The Hallelujah Chorus (A Sermon)

St. John never wrote a birth story. Instead, he celebrates God becoming human by singing the first Christmas carol. His song claims that this birth overcomes the darkness of this world and enables us to become children of God. Repeatedly, he says it makes available grace upon grace. In many ways grace is Christianity’s gift […]

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Lesson 11:  Hope (Part 2)

Lesson 11: Hope (Part 2)

Last week, I critiqued the picture of the Technium that one of the main characters in Dan Brown’s latest novel, Origin, predicts will begin in 2050. The Technium would be the perfect setting for a post-truth age. There is no need for truth or values, meaning or purpose, if science-based technology provides endless opportunities for […]

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Lesson 10: Hope

Lesson 10: Hope

A friend suggested Dan Brown’s latest novel, Origin, deals with science challenging religion much as our book does. When I took a look, it was obvious Edmund Kirsch, one of the main protagonists, is based on the futurist Ray Kurzweil whom we use as the epitome of technological expectation. Kirsch predicts the beginning of a new […]

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Lesson 9: Faith (Part 2)

Lesson 9: Faith (Part 2)

Last week I described faith as trusting the God found in the common story proclaimed by the Christian community. I boiled down that Gospel to God’s promise to be active in history, rescuing the creation from self-destruction and especially, humanity from the suffering it inflicts on itself. My Monday evening discussion group accused me of […]

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Lesson 8: Faith

Lesson 8: Faith

One way to read the Enlightenment Project is to see it placing decision making in the hands of individual persons rather than established authorities. Integral to this is investing power in knowledge tested against reality and experience instead of laws imposed by aristocracy and clergy. The scientific method, technological innovation, and democratic government now associated […]

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Lesson 7: Faith, Hope, and Love

Lesson 7: Faith, Hope, and Love

One of the major challenges confronting the Church is how we should be proclaiming the Gospel in this new electronic age. Last week, I suggested the first big step to resolving this question is gathering believers in person-to-person conversations. To that end, I have gathered 5 symposiums that have met regularly for at least two […]

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Lesson 6: Christian Words in the Electronic Age

Lesson 6: Christian Words in the Electronic Age

Scholars usually speak of 3 momentous stages of language: the spoken, written, and electronic word. Each has distinctive characteristics that most of us readily recognize. Each has consequences for religion as well as culture. In the age of the spoken word, persons communicated exclusively person to person. Because most of this was face to face, […]

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Lesson 5: Words

Lesson 5: Words

Even the ancients understood the essential role language plays for humanity. Genesis 1 acknowledges a rather sophisticated grasp of this when it portrays God using speech to create all things. It appears to build on the realization that speaking is always an act of creation and defines this action as naming and creating order out […]

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