Pastor Fritz Foltz

Pastor Foltz is Pastor Emeritus of Saint James Lutheran Church in Gettysburg, PA and author of the the Frontline Study content.

Lesson 1: Theology of the Spirit

Lesson 1: Theology of the Spirit

Many of us think Pope Francis serves as a much-needed model of the faith in our time, at least in his words and personal examples. Obviously, some of his witness has been thwarted by the very institutional structures that he identifies as outdated and irrelevant. I’d like to spend some time examining the Theology of […]

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Sodom and Gomorrah  (Genesis 19: 1-11)

Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 19: 1-11)

My wife helps me write sermons. Last week, she came home saying I should incorporate something about Service Week. “How am I going to do that when I promised to preach on Sodom and Gomorrah?” I moaned. And then, as if that were not challenging enough, she came a second time saying I should mention […]

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A Sermon for Maundy Thursday

A Sermon for Maundy Thursday

The Passover celebration is a family meal that begins when the youngest child asks, “Father, why is this night different than other nights?” The Father then tells the Exodus story as simply and clearly as possible, so that even this child can understand. “There was a time long ago when a mighty nation, who thought […]

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Celebrating Affirmation of Baptism

Celebrating Affirmation of Baptism

When Jesus was baptized, the writers report the heavens were torn apart, God’s Holy Spirit descended upon Jesus, and a voice pronounced, “You are my beloved son, in whom I am well pleased.” The message was clear: God loves Jesus, and his Spirit will fill Jesus’ life so that he can perform mighty deeds and […]

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Easter On The Road To Emmaus: The Dawn of a New Day

Easter On The Road To Emmaus: The Dawn of a New Day

In my denomination, we pretty much just celebrate on Easter Sunday. We read about the empty tomb, loudly proclaim, “He is Risen” to each other, and do a lot of singing. We wait until the following Sundays to reflect on what all this means. Then we take time to ponder Jesus’ appearances among his first […]

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Lesson 25: The Christian Voice

Lesson 25: The Christian Voice

After much discussion, I have decided to give in and admit talking about the common story of Christianity is not helpful. As many of you have pointed out, there are just too many incredibly divergent claims out there. Instead, I shall speak about the book’s understanding of what the Christian voice should be in the […]

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Lesson 24: Getting Real

Lesson 24: Getting Real

Last week I wrote that a proper understanding of faith, hope, and love provides a common story for the Church by acknowledging our real life connections to community, nature, time, and place. I quickly got a marvelous critique from Lupe that raised three challenging questions about the relevance of my thoughts. The first two stem […]

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Lesson 23: Connections

Lesson 23: Connections

The last two chapters in the book examine further how technique has damaged culture by removing things from their real-life contexts, how faith, hope, and love correct that for the Church, and how this enables the Church to offer much needed guidance to culture. In one of my face-to-face classes, I suggested that the customs, […]

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Lesson 22: The Passion Story

Lesson 22: The Passion Story

The Gospel of John changes the love command from “love your neighbor as you love yourself” to “love your friends as Jesus loved you.” When John has Jesus put it this way at the Last Supper, he immediately makes the Passion the best expression of Christian love. All of the many atonement theories that attempt […]

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Lesson 21: Friendship

Lesson 21: Friendship

At the end of his encyclical Laudato Si, Pope Francis suggested we use a spiritual rather than a technological paradigm in working with the environment. One thesis of our book is we do well to do the same in all personal relationships. I think of a paradigm as the theoretical perspective or framework we use to […]

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